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Leaving your brain to science: engaging with law and ethics

Leaving your brain to science: engaging with law and ethics

Tuesday, 25 March 2014 from 13:00 to 17:30Brains

Godfrey Thomson Hall Thomsons Land, University of Edinburgh Holyrood, Edinburgh
EH8 8AQ

Have you ever thought about leaving your brain to science?

Scientists today are using ‘banks’ of brain tissue for a range of research activities. But this raises challenging legal and ethical questions.
Who should give consent for the use of tissue? Who should get to access it? What kind of organisation should regulate brain banks?

This public event will look at exactly these issues, and a range of others. Several speakers – leading scientists and lawyers – will give short talks, and the audience will be invited to ask questions, and share their own thoughts and concerns.
The event is being held as part of a national network (sponsored by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council) of academics and other professionals researching the interactions between science, technology and law. This is your chance to shape the debates being carried out in the network, and feed into important conversations about the ways brain banks are regulated.

This free public event is aimed at anyone with an interest in discussing the ethical issues connected with brain banking. No prior knowledge or special training is required. Just come along to listen to the talks and share your thoughts!

Registration is from 13.00-13.30 and we will provide a small canapé lunch. Talks will start promptly at 13.30. There will be a break with light refreshments halfway through the afternoon. We will aim to finish at 17.15, and no later than 17.30.

Register online here.

The event is being organised as part of the AHRC-sponsored Technoscience, Law and Society Network. This is jointly convened by Dr Emilie Cloatre (University of Kent) and Dr Martyn Pickersgill (University of Edinburgh). For more information on this event or the Network, please contact Martyn at: martyn.pickersgill@ed.ac.uk